My father grew up in a Nile Delta village in Egypt. Then, his family made a living by farming. They did not have electricity until my dad married my mom. Only one home in the narrow street had a telephone. He had to walk five miles every day to get back and forth from school. He had to take a train for high school.

I’m reminiscing about my father because not too long ago people had to work a lot more for the calories they consumed. Food was sustenance, not entertainment.

I grew up in much more fortunate circumstances. It was the eighties. Everything was conveniently available. Our food was abundant. Growing up, I burned my calories playing soccer, riding my bike, or whatever else kids did. By the time I hit high school, I was studying more and moving less. I waded my way through thick Social Studies chapters, or a challenging calculus homework with the help of copious amounts of my mom’s cake, pies, cookies, and stacks of cheese pita wraps. Those were delicious.

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Since graduating from college, about sixteen years ago, I’ve been on one diet after another for a while. Every time, I fail. I tried them all: low carb, high protein, vegan, plant-based, and the list goes on. And every time I fail! With every fail, the guilt hit hard. I believed I was weak. Eventually I stopped thinking about dieting. Until I discovered that I had developed Type 2 Diabetes. “I have to deal with this” I thought.

I decided that if I can’t find a natural solution for my problem, I would go with one of the gastric surgeries around. My first condition for the solution was that it must be based on scientific research and implemented, scientifically, by professionals. I found this at Enara.

I started with Dr. Rami weighing 311lbs, my blood pressure was 163/98, with blood glucose hitting 145. I was out of breath most of the time. I would get chokes that woke me up in the middle of the night.

Three months later, on VLCD, I lost 65lbs, my diabetes has now been gone for two months, my blood pressure is back to normal, and I can’t wear most of my old clothes.

VLCD is not easy, but the staff at Enara will not leave you alone. They will give you all the support you need. My advice to you is: If Enara offers you help or a service, use it. They would even go out and shop with you. The Enara mobile app is a powerful tool. Make sure to study the content provided by Enara periodically as you go on with your progress. It helps keep your mind in the right place. As I wrote earlier, VLCD is not easy, but it easier with time and support.


Weight Loss progress:
Mohamed lost 65 Lbs (21% of his weight) in 4 months

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Reduced his Hg A1c by 18%: Reversed his Type 2 Diabetes

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  • Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of your blood hemoglobin that is coated with glucose (sugar). This test reflects your average blood sugar level for the past 2-3 months.
  • A level less than 5.7 is normal, and a level between 5.7 and 6.4 indicates pre-diabetes. A Hg A1c level of 6.5 percent or higher indicates Type 2 Diabetes.

Progress in HS (hypersensitive) CRP: 83%

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  • High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP) is a protein that increases in the blood with inflammation.
  • HS-CRP test may be used to help evaluate an individual for cardiovascular disease risk.
  • While less than 1.0 mg/L is considered low risk, average risk: 1.0 to 3.0 mg/L, and high risk: above 3.0 mg/L.

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  • Fatty foods and carbohydrates that we eat are broken down into globs of fat called triglycerides.
  • High levels increase your risk for heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage.
  • Excess glucose in the blood can be used to make triglycerides, which is why people with insulin sensitivity, prediabetes, or Diabetes often also have elevated triglycerides.

Start your own Success Story with Enara Health!

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Posted by:enarastaff

One thought on “Rockstar of The Month – October 2017 –

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